Credits: 5

Schedule: 19.11.2019 - 20.12.2019

Teacher in charge (valid 01.08.2018-31.07.2020): 

Sofia Pantouvaki

Contact information for the course (applies in this implementation): 

Responsible teacher: Susanna Suurla, susanna.suurla@aalto.fi

Guest tutor: Maarit
Kalmakurki, MA, Doctoral candidate Aalto University, maarit.kalmakurki@aalto.fi

Please note! Anyone
unable to attend fully should inform in advance the responsible teacher.

Teaching Period (valid 01.08.2018-31.07.2020): 

no teaching in 2018-2019

Learning Outcomes (valid 01.08.2018-31.07.2020): 

Upon completion of the course, the students are able to:

- Identify western fashion styles and how these can be used from a costume designer's perspective.

- Recognise period dress styles, forms and cuts, and define garments and accessories using approriate terminology.

-Relate dress and style with the historical, socio-political, economic and cultural context of a diversity of places and periods.

- Analyse style in a depth, including use of materials, body posture, habits and social manners in different time periods.

- Collect and evaluate sources relevant to period costume from broader cultural history, including the history of art and architecture.

Content (valid 01.08.2018-31.07.2020): 

The course provides an advanced study of period costume and style, and of the meanings of fashion and dress codes in different times relating European fashion history to the history of art. The courses examines the development of dress from the beginnings of mankind to contemporary times and provides a deep understanding of periods and the reasons that formed specific dress styles. It focuses on the socio-political, economic and cultural context of the development of dress and costume on and beyond the stage,null from a cultural history perspective that builds upon prior knowledge of the history of design. The course analyzes the elements that create the style of each period, such as forms, colours, materials, and decorative themes as well as additional elements that complement style, such as body posture, manners and the use of accessories. During the course, the students practice on identifying these elements and finding sources for the collection of information for the style of a diversity of periods. The course encourages a research-approach to the subject and entails independent work. It includes lectures, design-based and written assignments and a personal research task to be submitted as final assignment.

Details on the course content (applies in this implementation): 

Method of
implementation:
The course includes lectures, discussions, small presentations, reading and analysing texts,
independent work, creating a sketchbook and a short personal research essay.
Reading materials will be handed out during the
course.




Assessment Methods and Criteria (valid 01.08.2018-31.07.2020): 

Participation in lectures, presentations, outcome of assignments.

Criteria: 80% attendance, students' development during the course, motivation, independent and group work outcomes, and active participation in discussions.

Elaboration of the evaluation criteria and methods, and acquainting students with the evaluation (applies in this implementation): 

-       Each student is required to create a “period costume sketchbook” with drawings of each period examined and annotated in detail. Drawing is used as a method to learn and understand period costume.

-       Students are required to write a final essay (10 pages of writing in 12 size font and 1,5 spacing plus images to support the text) of their chosen topic, discussed in the beginning of the course. Research for the final essay starts at the beginning of the course.

-       Some topics (confirmed later) will be studied independently and submitted during the course.


Workload (valid 01.08.2018-31.07.2020): 

The course provides an advanced study of period costume and style, and of the meanings of fashion and dress codes in different times relating European fashion history to the history of art. The courses examines the development of dress from the beginnings of mankind to contemporary times and provides a deep understanding of periods and the reasons that formed specific dress styles. It focuses on the socio-political, economic and cultural context of the development of dress and costume on and beyond the stage,null from a cultural history perspective that builds upon prior knowledge of the history of design. The course analyzes the elements that create the style of each period, such as forms, colours, materials, and decorative themes as well as additional elements that complement style, such as body posture, manners and the use of accessories. During the course, the students practice on identifying these elements and finding sources for the collection of information for the style of a diversity of periods. The course encourages a research-approach to the subject and entails independent work. It includes lectures, design-based and written assignments and a personal research task to be submitted as final assignment.

Details on calculating the workload (applies in this implementation): 

Workload: 135h total

54h of contact teaching

81h of independent work, including finalising the sketchbook, tasks handed out during the course and final essay.


Study Material (valid 01.08.2018-31.07.2020): 

Select bibliography:

Boucher, François, 1966/1997. A History of Costume in the West. New enlarged edition. London/New York: Thames and Hudson.

English, Bonnie, 2007. A Cultural History of Fashion in the Twentieth Century – From the Catwalk to the Sidewalk. Oxford/New York: Berg.

Rieff Anawalt, Patricia, 2007. The Worldwide History of Dress. London: Thames & Hudson.

Tortora, Phyllis and Keith Eubank, 2006. Survey of Historic Costume. A History of Western Dress. Fourth Edition. New York: Fairchild Publications, Inc.

Welters, Linda and Abby Lillethun, 2011. The Fashion Reader, Second Edition. Oxford and New York: Berg.

Other specific literature will be informed separately.

Details on the course materials (applies in this implementation): 

More specific description of the themes of each contact day

Week 47

Tuesday  19.11.2019  

-       Working methods, guidelines for the final essay. Course schedule. Introduction to the topic. Function of dress in the social context. Studying historical garments, sources of evidences.

-       Mesopotamian civilisations: Mesopotamians, Sumerians and Babylonians.

-       Egyptian civilisations: the costume development during the Old, Middle and New Kingdom. Men’s and women’s garments, fabrics, social life and structure, decorative motifs and religious symbols.

Thursday 21.11.2019     

-       Ancient Aegean, Minoan and Greek civilisations. Art and how to use this as a source of information about costume.

-       Heroic, Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic Greece. Development of Doric peplos to Ionic chiton, Doric chiton, Hellenistic chiton. Greek civilization and social organisation. Fabrics and cloth production.

-       Etruscans and Roman civilisations. Social life of the Etruscans and Roman Empire. Chiton develops to Toga.    

 Friday 22.11.2019    

-       Byzantine (early period), silk production

-       Romanesque and early middle ages. Political development and divisions in Europe in 900 – 1300, Franks, German dynasties and Anglo – Saxon Britain.

-       Heraldry and crusades

Week 48 

Thursday 28.11.2019 

-       Late middle ages. Medieval social structure, rise of guilds, fabrics and tailors

-       Plague and how it affected to social life

-       Renaissance (Italy, Spain) and regional differences in style and costume between southern and central Europe and around Italy. Wool and silk production in Italy. Spanish wealth acquired through trade goods from the Americas and the influence on costume

Friday 29.11.2019    

-       Tudor England, Henry III and his wives influence to fashion.

-       Elizabethan England. Queen Elisabeth’s influences in fashion. Italian lace industry and the connection to current fashion.

-       Holy Roman Empire and Spain

-       Central European dress styles in the 16th Century. Differences between Central European and British fashion

Week 49

Tuesday 3.12  

-       Central European fashion, Louis XIII and Marie de Medici

-       Social structure in the 17th century

-       Baroque. Louis XIV and his influence on all areas of arts and fashion, court manners in Louis XIV court. 

Thursday 5.12      

-       Early 18th Century. British cotton industry. Laws which influenced to fashion changes. Arts, such as Watteau influencing to fashion.

-       Rococo, Marie Antoinette

-       Empire. British industrial age, invention of steamboat and how it influenced to the import of textile and fashion goods.

Week 51

Wednesday 18.12       

-       Romantic period. New social classes. Queen Victoria of England and her influencing fashion styles and family life. Bloomer dress.

-       Crinoline and the development of new supports under the skirt. Mourning costume. Aesthetic dress. New dyes and how they influenced fashion.

-       Bustle period. New textile blends such as wool and silk. Invention of sewing machine and textile/garment mass production. Rise of the middle class and feminism.

Thursday 19.12           

-       Transitional gown (Lingerie look, Mermaid look)

-       Imported cotton goods and Japanese imports

-       New “leisure time” outfits and fashion

-       Turn of the century and the extreme X- silhouette

-       Beginning of the 20th century. Mail order. Commercial prints by Mucha.

-       Working woman, new kind of garments needed. Rise of unions to support workers.

-       Fashion houses such as Fortuny, Vionnet and Paul Poiret, Chanel

-       WWI influences

-       1920’s style, American stock exchange boom

 

Friday 20.12               

-       Film industry and the influence of films and film stars to fashion

-       Fabric development in the 20th century. (Viscose, man-made fibres, vinyl, PVC)

-       WW II and sumptuary laws, war-time fashion

-       1950’s, Christian Dior’s New Look.

-       Cotton in the 1950’s and other textiles

-       Tailored suit, pants become more popular.

-       1960’s geometric styles

-       Style genres after WW II (mod-look, hippie, punk, glam rock etc.)

-       1980’s. Music stars and athletes influence to fashion trends

-       Strong economy and the depression in the beginning of the 1990’s

 

20.1.2020   3 hours reserved for final essay feedback



Course Homepage (valid 01.08.2018-31.07.2020): 

https://mycourses.aalto.fi/course/search.php?search=ELO-E6501

Prerequisites (valid 01.08.2018-31.07.2020): 

Art History, History of Dress or equivalent studies

Grading Scale (valid 01.08.2018-31.07.2020): 

0-5

Registration for Courses (valid 01.08.2018-31.07.2020): 

WebOodi registration

 

The order of priority for admitting students to courses at Aalto ARTS 1.1.2018 onwards (approved by The Committee of Arts, Design and Architecture on 10.10.2017)

The order of priority is as follows:

  1. students for whom the course is compulsory for their major/programme and who have scheduled it for the current academic year in their personal study plan (HOPS);
  2. exchange students for whom the course is a part of his/her officially approved learning agreement and scheduled to be taken during the current semester;
  3. students for whom the course is compulsory for their major/programme and who have not completed it yet;
  4. students, for whom the course is part of his/her major’s or programme’s alternative studies and has been scheduled in the student's PSP (HOPS) for the current academic year
  5. students, for whom the course is part of his/her major’s or programme’s alternative studies and who have not completed the requisite number of credits for alternative studies yet;
  6. students for whom the course is compulsory for their minor;
  7. students, for whom the course is part of his/her minor subject’s alternative studies and who have not completed the requisite number of credits for alternative studies yet;
  8. students who have applied for the course through a student mobility scheme (internal mobility within Aalto University, flexible study right (JOO) studies etc.);
  9. other students.

 

Courses that are intended to be multidisciplinary (e.g. UWAS courses) may apply an order of priority based on the learning outcomes of the course, while bearing in mind the university obligation of enabling students to complete their degrees within the normative duration of study set for the degree. The order of priority does not apply to courses organised by the Centre for General Studies or doctoral courses.

This decision on the order of priority does not influence the right of the teacher to define prerequisites for the course.

Further Information (valid 01.08.2018-31.07.2020): 

Students will be accepted to the course in the following order:

-Students of costume design major, for whom the course is compulsory

- Students of costume design major, for whom the course is optional

- Exchange students of costume design

- Minor students of costume design, whose major is production design or design for the performing arts

- Minor students of costume design, whose major is another than production design or design for the performing arts

- Other students of production design and design for the performing arts

- Other students of the department of Film, Television and Scenography

- Other students

Additional information for the course (applies in this implementation): 

Additional lectures from the Scenography and Costume lectures course: 

Wednesday
20 November. 
9:15 –
12:00, Väre, room F101

Scenography Lecture: Observing digitality for artistic purposes

Teemu
Määttänen


Wednesday
27 November. 
9:15 –
12:00, Väre, room L102

Costume Lecture: Catherine
Jagiellon's wardrobe in inventories 1562-1563.

Nina
Manninen (FM)


Wedneday
4 December. 
9:15 –
12:00, Väre, room F101

Costume Lecture (In
Finnish only)

Renesanssia ja Barokkia teatteripuvuissa, sekä katsaus
lastenvaatetuksen muutoksiin vuosisatojen aikana.

Samppa Lahdenperä

HUOM! Luennolle tarvitaan piirustus/
luonnosteluvälineet mukaan.




Details on the schedule (applies in this implementation): 

Schedule:

Week 47

Tuesday 19.11 

  • 10.15
    – 16.00  5 hours
Wednesday 20.11             

  • 9.15 –
    12.00  Scenography 
    Lecture, part of lectures course, see additional information.
  • 13.00 – 16.00      3
    hours Independent work
Thursday 21.11           
  • 10.15
    – 16.00  5
    hours

Friday 22.11.

  • 10.15 – 16.00  5 hours


Week 48

Tuesday 26.11             

  • independent
    work

Wednesday 27.11             

  •  9.15 –
    12.00  Costume 
    Lecture part of the costume lectures
    course, see additional information
  • 13.00 – 16.00      3
    hours Independent work

Thursday 28.11           

  • 10.15
    – 16.00  5 hours

Friday 29.11                

  • 10.15
    – 16.00  5 hours

           

Week 49

Tuesday 3.12   

  • 10.15
    – 16.00  5 hours

Wednesday 4.12         

  • 9:15 – 12.00    Costume Lecture as part of the Costume Lectures course, see additional information
  •  13.00 – 16.00  3 hours independent work

Thursday 5.12 

  •  10.15
    – 16.00  5 hours

Friday 6.12                  public
holiday

 

Week 50

--- This week is scheduled for ELO joint courses

 

Week 51

Tuesday 17.12            

  •  independent
    work

Wednesday 18.12      

  •  09.15
    – 16.00  6 hours

Thursday 19.12           

  • 10.15
    – 16.00  5 hours

Friday 20.12               

  •  09.15
    – 15.00  5 hours

TOTAL 51 contact hours

 

Final
essay submission on Sunday 5.1.2020

 

Week 4 / 2020

Monday 20.1  

  •  9.15
    – 12.00                3 hours feedback
    session


Description

Registration and further information