Reading material for the exam

Lecture #

Topics

Online reading material

1

User-centred design process

Multidisciplinary nature of IT use (the PACT and ABCS framework)

Lecture 1 slides

Assignment 1 instructions.

Ritter et al (2014): Foundations for Designing User-Centered Systems. Chapters 1 & 2.

2

Goal-directedness of human behaviour

Mental models

Seven stages of action + gulfs of evaluation and execution

Hierarchical task analysis

Lecture 2 slides

Assignment 2 instructions.

Ritter et al (2014): Foundations for Designing User-Centered Systems. Chapter 11

Annett: Hierarchical task analysis. In E. Hollnagel (Ed.), Handbook of Cognitive Task Design. (pp. 17-35). Erlbaum.

3

Usability criteria, heuristics and characteristics

Heuristic evaluation

Prototyping

Lecture 3 slides

Assignment 3 instructions.

Ritter et al (2014): Foundations for Designing User-Centered Systems. Chapter 13.3.3.

Nielsen (1995): How to Conduct a Heuristic Evaluation

Lim et al. (2008): The anatomy of prototypes: Prototypes as filters, prototypes as manifestations of design ideas. ACM Transactions on Computer–Human Interaction, Vol. 15, No. 2, Article 7. 

4

Computational approach to UI design

Lecture 4 slides

Assignment 4 instructions

Oulasvirta (2017): User interface design with combinatorial optimization. IEEE Computer, Vol. 50, No. 1, pp. 40–47.

5

Research design

Research question and its operationalization through research methods

Reliability and validity

Bias

Triangulated and redundant multi-method research designs

Qualitative vs. quantitative methods

Mixed-method designs (qualitative+quantitative)

Principles of ethical treatment of human participants

Lecture 5 slides

Assignment 5 instructions

Ritter et al (2014): Foundations for Designing User-Centered Systems. Chapters 13.1–13.2

6

Quantitative analysis

Independent and dependent variable

Internal, external, construct and ecological validity

What ANOVA/t-test, linear regression and contingency table analyses measure

Lecture 6 slides

Assignment 6 instructions

Hornbaek (2013): Some whys and hows of experiments in human–computer interaction. Foundations and Trends in Human–Computer Interaction Vol. 5, No. 4, Chapters 1–4.

7

Qualitative analysis

Saturation

Open and axial coding

Lecture 7 slides

Assignment 7 instructions

Elliott & Timulak (2005). Descriptive and interpretive approaches to qualitative research. In Jeremy Miles, Paul Gilbert (eds): A Handbook of Research Methods for Clinical and Health Psychology. Oxford University Press, pp. 147-159.

Muller (2014). Curiosity, creativity, and surprise as analytic tools: grounded theory method. In Olson & Kellogg (eds.) Ways of knowing in HCI, pp. 25–48.

8

User models in HCI

Lecture 8 slides

Assignment 8 instructions

Oulasvirta (2019). It's time to rediscover HCI models. interactions, July-August, 52-56.

9

Multimodal interaction

Multimodal integration/fusion

Focused and divided attention

Multiple resources theory

Lecture 9 slides

Assignment 9 instructions

Ritter et al (2014): Foundations for Designing User-Centered Systems. Chapter 5.3.1.

Wickens, C. W. (2002). Multiple resources and performance prediction. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, 3(2), 159-177. 

10

Mobile interaction and context-aware computing

Lecture 10 slides

Assignment 10 instructions

Salovaara & Oulasvirta (2004). Six modes of proactive resource management: A user-centric typology for proactive behaviors. NordiCHI 2004. https://doi.org/10.1145/1028014.1028022



Last modified: Tuesday, 19 November 2019, 1:23 PM